Archives

Transformation

In a world built on fear, domination, manipulation, conflict, and greed, embracing pronoia is a radical act. Pronoia is not about being against anything. It’s about standing for who you are and your deepest truth here in this moment. Pronoia is much more than a “concept” or “idea.” It is a personal mindset and way of life. It’s believing in every fiber of your being that you matter and every circumstance of life, blissful or challenging, is a new opportunity to receive a blessing. Pronoia is not about looking at life through rose-colored glasses or believing that everything is sunshine and rainbows. On the contrary, it is seeing the truth of this moment for exactly what it is and intelligently acting with the care, grace, and love that is required. As author Rob Brezsny says, “pronoia is the antidote for paranoia.” When we open ourselves to see the opportunity, the
https://youtu.be/2R3Njv0LjjM The answer might seem simple, but in the hands of Lesley Hazleton, the question takes us on a surprisingly humorous and thought-provoking journey into what it would actually mean to live forever. And whether we’d truly want to. A frequent TED.com speaker and 'Accidental Theologist,' Hazleton uses wit and wisdom to challenge our ideas not only about death, but about what it is to live well. Lesley Hazleton has traced the roots of conflict in several books, including compelling 'flesh-and-blood' biographies of Muhammad and Mary, and casts "an agnostic eye on politics, religion, and existence" on her blog, AccidentalTheologist.com. Her newest book, Agnostic: A Spirited Manifesto, celebrates the agnostic stance as "rising above the flat two-dimensional line of belief/unbelief, creating new possibilities for how we think about being in the world." In it, she explores what we mean by the search for meaning, invokes the humbling perspective of infinity
https://youtu.be/iub-BequAYo Krishnamurti with students at the Thacher School One should have a bit of skepticism when asking questions. A wrong question will have no answer, but a right question, in its very asking, unfolds the understanding of it. It needs intelligence and sensitivity to ask the right question and to see all that is involved in it and go to the very end of it. The real revolution Series These eight programmes were produced and broadcast in America by the National Educational Television Network. They represent the earliest sound films of Krishnamurti speaking to audiences – it was the first time that he had allowed his talks and discussion groups to be filmed. The principle settings are the Oak Grove in Ojai, California, and the Thacher School in the Ojai Valley.
Cultivating intimacy with something means becoming sufficiently close to it to know it very, very well. When we don’t get close enough — like scientists keeping themselves emotionally stranded from their subject of study — we miss essential aspects of it. And if we get too close, to the point of fusing with it — like new lovers letting their boundaries collapse in a romantic swoon — we will no longer be able to keep it in focus. In intimacy, we are deeply relating to an “other” — which could be a person, object, or state — getting close to it in a manner that transcends mere proximity. When it comes to cultivating intimacy with something, connection with it and separation from it are not opposites, but rather fluidly intertwined dance partners. When we become intimate with a particular emotion, its arising is no longer treated as a bad thing
https://youtu.be/bX32U_hfri4 We often define ourselves by things that are "outside" us: relationships, work, family — even our own bodies. But what would it mean to have your life dramatically altered and your body irrevocably damaged? Who would you be then? This talk explores the impact of loss on the human psyche and the universal quest to find meaning and fulfillment. It is only through the process of losing everything we thought we needed that we find who we truly are.
https://youtu.be/6P2nPI6CTlc Nick talks about the importance of parenting in early childhood and it's significance in overcoming hopelessness. Willpower is a driving force for making our big dreams come true, but if we don't get a miracle in life, we can always be a miracle to someone else. Nick Vujicic was born in Australia to a Serbian immigrant family, with a rare disorder characterized by the absence of all four limbs. Most of his childhood he struggled with depression, and after a suicide attempt he decided to concentrate on what he did have instead on what he didn't. He realized that his life story inspires many people.