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What's Inside This Article: Non-toxic cleaning recipes that really work (ALL PURPOSE CLEANING, DISHES, LAUNDRY, GLASS/MIRRORS, TOILETS, and GRANITE COUNTERTOPS), plus what to buy when you don’t want to DIY.  Let’s play a game. You choose any cleaning product on the shelf at your local market and state what’s in it. Easy, right? All you need to do is read the label. There’s only one problem – ingredients are not required to be listed unless they’re already known to be harmful, and pretty much no one’s checking to find out if they are. The government only requires companies to list ‘chemicals of known concern’ on their labels. The key word here is ‘known’,” consumer advocate Sloan Barnett told Scientific American. “The fact is that the government has no idea whether most of the chemicals used in everyday cleaning products are safe because it doesn’t test them, and it doesn’t require manufacturers
The medical profession oversells the benefits of drugs for chronic disease since so few patients would apparently take them if doctors divulged the truth.   References: B Hudson, A Zarifeh, L Young, J E Wells. Patients' expectations of screening and preventive treatments. Ann Fam Med. 2012 Nov-Dec;10(6):495-502. P Lytsy, R Westerling. Patient expectations on lipid-lowering drugs. Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Jul;67(1-2):143-50. P N Trewby, A V Reddy, C S Trewby, V J Ashton, G Brennan, J Inglis. Are preventive drugs preventive enough? A study of patients' expectatio n of benefit from preventive drugs. Clin Med. 2002 Nov-Dec;2(6):527-33. H Leaman, P R Jackson. What benefit do patients expect from adding second and third antihypertensive drugs? Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2002 Jan;53(1):93-9. C B Jr Esselstyn, G Gendy, J Doyle, M Golubic, M F Roizen. A way to reverse CAD? J Fam Pract. 2014 Jul;63(7):356-364b.
More people might be open to changing their diet and lifestyle if they knew how little modern medicine has to offer for combating chronic diseases.   References: T V Pereira, R I Horwitz, J P Ioannidis. Empirical evaluation of very large treatment effects of medical interventions. JAMA. 2012 Oct 24;308(16):1676-84. B Starfield. Is US health really the best in the world? JAMA. 2000 Jul 26;284(4):483-5. Y Ishida. Deficiencies in US medical care. JAMA. 2000 Nov 1;284(17):2185; author reply 2186-7. K Gilbert, C Stafford, K Crosby, E Flemming, R Gaynes. Does hand hygiene compliance among health care workers change when patients are in contact precaution rooms in ICUs? Am J Infect Control. 2010 Sep;38(7):515-7. R Nasr, SL Traboulsi, R Rami, A Ghaida, J Bakhach. Iatrogenic Penile Glans Amputation: Major Novel Reconstructive Procedure. Case Reports in Urology Volume 2013 (2013). L L Leape, D M Berwick. Five years after To Err Is
https://youtu.be/dVArDzYynYc Dr. Valter Longo is the Edna M. Jones Professor of Gerontology and Biological Sciences, and Director of the Longevity Institute at the University of Southern California – Davis School of Gerontology, Los Angeles. Dr. Longo’s studies focus on the fundamental mechanisms of aging in simple organisms, mice and humans. The Longo laboratory has identified several genetic pathways that regulate aging in simple organisms and reduce the incidence of multiple diseases in mice and humans. His laboratory also described both dietary and genetic interventions that protect cells and improve the treatment and prevention of cancer and other diseases in mammals. He received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) in 1997 and his postdoctoral training in the Neurobiology of Aging and Alzheimer’s Diseases at USC. He started his independent career in 2000 at the University of Southern California, School of Gerontology.
A walk in the park may soothe the mind and, in the process, change the workings of our brains in ways that improve our mental health, according to an interesting new study of the physical effects on the brain of visiting nature. Most of us today live in cities and spend far less time outside in green, natural spaces than people did several generations ago. City dwellers also have a higher risk for anxiety, depression and other mental illnesses than people living outside urban centers, studies show. These developments seem to be linked to some extent, according to a growing body of research. Various studies have found that urban dwellers with little access to green spaces have a higher incidence of psychological problems than people living near parks and that city dwellers who visit natural environments have lower levels of stress hormones immediately afterward than people who have not recently
https://youtu.be/7tu9nJmr4Xs Lissa Rankin, MD is an OB/GYN physician, author, keynote speaker, consultant to health care visionaries, professional artist, and founder of the women's health and wellness community OwningPink.com. Discouraged by the broken, patriarchal health care system, she left her medical practice in 2007 only to realize that you can quit your job, but you can't quit your calling. This epiphany launched her on a journey of discovery that led her to become a leader in the field of mind/body medicine, which she blogs about at OwningPink.com and is writing about in her third book Mind Over Medicine: Scientific Proof You Can Heal Yourself (Hay House, 2013). She teaches both patients and health care professionals how to make the body ripe for miracles by healing the mind and being healthy in all aspects of life, not just by promoting healthy behaviors like good nutrition, exercise, and adequate sleep, but by encouraging
The burden of disease and death attributable to environmental pollution is becoming a public health challenge worldwide, especially in developing countries. The kidney is vulnerable to environmental pollutants because most environmental toxins are concentrated by the kidney during filtration. Given the high mortality and morbidity of kidney disease, environmental risk factors and their effect on kidney disease need to be identified. In this Review, we highlight epidemiological evidence for the association between kidney disease and environmental pollutants, including air pollution, heavy metal pollution and other environmental risk factors. We discuss the potential biological mechanisms that link exposure to environmental pollutants to kidney damage and emphasize the contribution of environmental pollution to kidney disease. Regulatory efforts should be made to control environmental pollution and limit individual exposure to preventable or avoidable environmental risk. Population studies with accurate quantification of environmental exposure in polluted regions, particularly in developing countries, might aid our